Mathematics

Mathematics

Mathematics

Pre-Calculus
Course Description
This course is designed for students who plan to attend college or enter a technical career which requires advanced math skills.
Topics include: Limits and continuity, differentiation, rates of change, differentiation techniques, higher order derivatives, maximum/minimum problems, implicit differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions, the anti-derivative, the finite integral and various application problems.
 
Geometry
Course Description
Geometry is a course that explores properties, measurements, and relationships of points, lines, surfaces, and solids in space. Students integrate their extensive knowledge of Algebra 1 with Euclidian geometry concepts to solve real world problems. It is a year-long course and meets for 45 minutes each day.
 
Students are required to have a full credit in Algebra I with a preference for college prep Algebra I prior to taking this course. Students must have passed Algebra I or have obtained permission of the building principal in order to take geometry.
 
Algebra II
Course Description
Algebra II include all the essential topics needed to be successful in College Algebra, Pre-Calculus or Trigonometry. Topics covered are listed specifically under the scope and sequence
and include: operations on vectors and matrices; factorial notation; analyzing families functions; quadratic formula; logarithms; trigonometric functions; families of functions with graphs that have rotation symmetry or reflection symmetry; graphs of conic sections; complex numbers; recursive functions; least squares regression lines; regression coefficient; correlation coefficient; random sampling; analyze and summarize data; use technology to compute standard deviation; and use of spreadsheets and graphing calculators. Algebra II meets 45 minutes each day and covers the entire school year. One math credit is earned. Prerequisite for Algebra II: Students must earn a C or better in both Geometry and Algebra I or permission of the instructor.
 
Consumer Math
Course Description
Math skills needed to survive as an intelligent consumer in today's society will be developed in Consumer Math. Topics will include the mathematics of personal income, buying a car and related expenses, purchasing various types of insurance, housing, unit pricing, discounts and mark-ups, banking, budgeting, investments, taxes, travel and fitness. All juniors and seniors would benefit by taking this course.
 
Medical Math through Sinclair Community College, 3 credit hours
Compute with fractions, decimals, percentages, and solve allied health applications; convert within and between metric, household and apothecary systems; read and interpret allied health graphs, labels and forms; calculate and apply statistical concepts; solve problems involving scientific notation. 
 
Calculus through Hocking College, 5 credit hours
A study of limits, derivatives, and integration, considered analytically, numerically and graphically. 
 
Algebra III
This course covers quadratics, conics, polynomials, functions, logarithms, clever factorizations and substitutions, systems of equations, sequences and series, symmetric sums, advanced factoring methods, classical inequalities, and functional equations. This class covers much of the curriculum of a standard Algebra 2 class and most of the non-trigonometric topics of a typical Pre-Calculus course. It also includes many challenging aspects of algebraic problem solving that are beyond that presented in a typical Algebra 2 or Pre-Calculus course.
 
Algebra II – College Prep – can earn college credit 
This is an accelerated course. Most of the topics are the same as those found in Algebra II but are covered more rapidly and in greater depth. This course begins with connections back to earlier work, efficiently reviewing Algebraic and statistical concepts that students have already studied while at the same time moving students forward into new concepts. Students expand their library of functions to include polynomial functions, logarithmic functions, rational functions, and trigonometric functions. With a larger library of functions, students increase their ability to model situations, make predictions and answer questions about the situation.  
 

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